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NPR's Here and Now visits Ebb Carbon to explore our marine carbon capture solution

Climate change is ravaging the oceans. Some startups see a solution in marine carbon capture.

With the flip of a switch at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s seaside facility in Sequim, Washington, a tangle of pipes and filters whirrs into action, scrubbing acid from the cool gray waters of the Salish Sea. It’s the pilot project of Ebb Carbon, one of several companies building a business on ocean carbon removal technology.

NPR's Here and Now

Ebb Carbon CEO Ben Tarbell shares Watt It Takes to slow global climate change

To slow global climate change, we need to find ways to supercharge natural carbon removal processes, and do it in a way that is good for the planet

That’s exactly what Ben Tarbell, Co-Founder and CEO of Ebb Carbon, is doing. I spoke to Ben about his journey, from his childhood spent obsessed with building and engineering, to his career in solar, to prototyping the Ebb system in a bathroom-less empty warehouse, to opening Ebb’s first site and starting to meaningfully remove carbon via the ocean.

Watt It Takes

CNBC features Ebb Carbon

This startup is helping the ocean absorb more harmful carbon emissions

Removing carbon from the atmosphere is a growing field of business in the fight against global warming, but it’s not just big air vacuums doing the work. New technology is targeting an even bigger potential resource: the ocean.

CNBC

Canary Media

Ebb Carbon wants to pull CO₂ from the sky with electricity and seawater

At a waterfront lab in Sequim Bay, a quiet inlet on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula, the startup Ebb Carbon is trying to answer a crucial question for the climate: Can we supercharge the ocean’s role as a carbon sink to help limit global warming?

Canary Media

CNN

How to Unscrew a Planet

In this one hour CNN documentary that aired on Anderson Cooper's "The Whole Story," CNN visits Ebb's headquarters and other climate capture companies, and finds optimism in the face of global catastrophe.

CNN

Fast Company

This tech uses seawater to fight climate change—and stops another ocean disaster in the process

The ocean can suck up a lot of carbon (good!) but that process makes the water dangerously acidic (bad!). Ebb Carbon has found a way to put more carbon in, while lowering the acidity levels at the same time.

Fast Company

CNN

To my son, born in the climate crisis: I see signs of hope

CNN's Chief Climate correspondent, Bill Weir, pens this heartfelt Earth Day letter to his 4-year old son River about why Ebb Carbon and its peers give him hope for the future.

CNN

Business Insider

This startup founded by ex-Tesla, Google, and SolarCity staffers uses the ocean for carbon removal. Check out the 13-slide pitch deck Ebb Carbon used to raise $20 million.

An ocean-based carbon removal company founded by former Tesla, SolarCity, and Google X employees has just secured $20 million in Series A financing. (Subscription required)

Business Insider

Business Insider

The 37 most promising climate-tech startups of 2022, from microplastics to toilets, according to top VCs

Why it's poised to take off: Ebb Carbon has built a system that fits into a shipping container, says Ed Phillips of Future Planet Capital. Ebb Carbon's system "can reach gigaton scale at sub-$100 a ton of CO₂ captured" while also using less energy than other methods, Phillips added.

Business Insider

Sustainable Brands

This Startup Is Enhancing the Ocean’s Ability to Store Carbon, Reversing Acidification

Ebb Carbon’s pioneering carbon-removal technology combines with electrochemistry to accelerate the ocean's natural process of carbon removal, safely storing it for 10,000+ years, whilst simultaneously reducing ocean acidity — helping heal one of our strongest assets in the climate change fight.

Sustainable Brands

CleanTechnica

Interview With Ebb Carbon Founder Ben Tarbell

"The ocean is the unsung hero of climate change and it’s been pushed to its limits... we have both an obligation and an opportunity here to help the ocean by aiding its ability to sequester CO₂ and clean up some of the damage that humanity has caused it through carbon emissions and warming."

CleanTechnica

Green Biz

A dream team for ocean carbon capture?

A group of former Google, SolarCity and Tesla executives in April snagged $20 million in what is being called the largest ocean-based carbon removal investment to date.

Green Biz

IN THE PRESS

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